1. Money

What's the Difference Between Commuting Expenses and Travel Expenses?

By

Question: What's the Difference Between Commuting Expenses and Travel Expenses?
Answer:

Travel Expenses vs. Commuting Expenses
The IRS allows businesses to deduct expenses for business travel by owners and employees, but no deductions are allowed for commuting expenses. The rationale is that everyone commutes (travels to work), so commuting is not a business but a personal expense. On the other hand, expenses for business travel are a business expense and therefore are deductible. The IRS makes a distinction between commuting and business travel; commuting expenses are allowed only in specific cases, while business travel expenses are usually allowed, within limits.

A note: IRS regulations on expense deductions for travel are complex; the purpose of this article is to give you some general information but not to cover all definitions and regulations. For more details, refer to IRS Publication 463 - Travel, Entertainment, Gift, and Car Expenses.

What are commuting expenses?
The distance between your home and your place of work is your commute, and the time you spend driving between home and work, no matter how far, is your commuting distance. The IRS does not generally allow deductions for commuting expenses. Think of it this way - everyone needs to get to work, employees and business owners alike, so this expense is not part of your business.

In one Tax Court case, a self-employed individual who traveled each day from home to temporary work sites up to 96 miles away, and back home each night. That's a long commute, but it's still commuting, not traveling. The Tax Court said that the the worker's home and the temporary work sites were all within the general metropolitan area of a large Midwestern city, so the trips were commuting.

Travel Expenses
Business travel, on the other hand, is not commuting, if it meets any of the following conditions:

  • If you have at least one regular work location away from your home and your travel is to a temporary work location in the same trade or business, regardless of the distance. Generally, the IRS considers that a temporary work location is one where your employment is expected to last 1 year or less.
  • The travel is to a temporary work location outside the metropolitan area where you live and normally work.
  • Your home is your principal place of business and the travel is to another work location in the same trade or business, regardless of whether that location is regular or temporary and regardless of distance. The IRS considers that your home is your principal place of business if you deduct expenses for business use of your home (not as an employee).

What Expenses You Can Deduct
If your travel is not commuting but is business travel, you can deduct travel expenses including:

  • Transportation by airplane, train, bus, or car between your home and your business destination
  • Taxi, limo, or shuttle expenses
  • Baggage fees or shipping of work-related materials (to a trade show, for example)
  • Car expenses, for use of your own car or a rental car (you must separate out any personal use of a car, which is not deductible)
  • Lodging and meals, if your trip is overnight or long enough that you need to stop for sleep or rest
  • Dry cleaning and laundry expenses
  • Business-related phone calls while you are away
  • Tips for business-related expenses while you are traveling
  • Other business-related expenses while you are traveling.
It's important to keep good records on these expenses so you can show business purpose.

IRS Explanations
The IRS has a simple explanation of when transportation expenses are deductible (if your home is not your primary place of business). Refer to IRS Publication 587-Business Use of Your Home for more information on how to determine if your home is your principal place of business.

Read more about business expenses for international travel

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.